Brochure:

General

Scottish Blackface, also known as Scotties, are an extremely hardy breed of sheep developed in Scotland. The origins of the breed have been lost in time but they are believed to date back to the 12th century where references to the breed are recorded in monastery records. Scotties are known for their ability to survive in the harsh conditions of the Scottish highlands and produce premium quality lambs on pasture alone.

Scottish Blackface sheep are a medium sized sheep with distinctive black and white markings on their face and legs.  There are three distinct wool types within the breed that vary in both staple length (6-12”) and texture.  Depending on type, the wool of the Scottish Blackface is used for Harris Tweed, carpets or mattress stuffing.  The ewes, as well as the rams, are horned.

Scotties are known for their survivability, which is characterized by their hardy nature that allows them to thrive and successfully raise lambs on marginal pasture and harsh weather conditions of the Scottish highlands.

Scottish Blackface lamb is renowned for its mild, sweet flavor.  Our lambs are raised exclusively on mother’s milk and pasture, resulting in lean lamb that is rich in Omega 3 fatty acids.  We utilize rotational grazing to ensure optimal health of our pastures and the sheep that graze them.

Scottish Blackface is the Maternal Breed for Grass-Based Lamb Production.  This is a three-tiered production system where Scottish Blackface ewes are crossed with another hill breed such as BlueFaced Leicester or Chevoit Rams to produce the Scotch Mule.

Scottie ewes are known for their excellent mothering abilities and lamb unassisted by their shepherds.  Scottie lambs are quick to stand and nurse, features that are attributed not only to the hardiness of the breed, but also to the attentive nature and mothering abilities of the ewes.

Scottie Rams are mild tempered with impressive horns that form a full curl by the second year of age.

This information is from the sbbu.org website.

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